naamah_darling: Glass of tawny port on a table branded with a seven-pointed star. (Port Wine and the Morning Star)
Looking for the ginger slut recipe? Click here!

I love you guys, so I'll tell you how to make candied ginger my way.

Start with raw ginger root. You want big, healthy roots that feel hard, not spongy. (Yes, ginger is very sexy. Why do you ask?) They should be cool and heavy in the hand, and the skin should be smooth and crisp without any leatheriness. Ten ounces of root will yield you about six ounces of prepared raw ginger. You might buy enough to try a couple of times, if you've never done this before.

Break the ginger into manageable pieces and peel them. In theory, you could use a potato peeler, but because ginger is so knobbly I usually wind up using a paring knife. Peel off all the tiny warts and cut out any discolored spots.

Take the individual peeled pieces, take a sharp knife, and slice them. The slices should be about 1/8 inch thick, but a little thicker or a little thinner never hurt anyone. If it's very fibrous ginger, cut across the grain. If it's not, you can cut with the grain and stab larger slices several times to tenderize them. Watch your fingers! Ginger juice burns like a mofo.

Dump the ginger into a big bowl and cover it with sugar. Stir, add more sugar. For six ounces, you want 2 cups. If you don't have an exact weight to go on, mix sugar with the ginger until the sugar coats the pieces thickly. There should be a little loose sugar at the bottom of the bowl, but not a whole lot. (If you use a bit too much, it's no big deal -- it'll just take a little longer to reduce and leave you with more leftover sugar at the end.)

Put one tablespoon of water into a good-sized saucepan or skillet, pour in the ginger and sugar, and slowly bring it to a simmer. The sugar will melt into syrup, which will bubble and foam up through the ginger slices. The ginger itself will go from stiff and white to pliant and a rich golden color. It also shrinks by about half. When it's simmering but not boiling, turn the heat as low as you can while still maintaining the simmer and leave it alone for a while. Stir it every ten minutes or so. Be very careful with your heat – if you are cooking it too hot, it will caramelize and burn in the blink of an eye. Better to go too slow than too fast.

You will start to see a little fine yellowish-white foam clotting at the edges of the boiling center mass. This is good! You should be able to smell it now, which is also nice. Stir slowly, separating the slices as you go. It should simmer for about an hour before it begins to thicken. When the syrup is slightly golden and drips freely but slowly off your spoon, start keeping an eye on it, stirring gently every minute or so.

It will reduce, and reduce, and reduce, bubbling all over the surface, slowly becoming thicker and thicker as the sugar crystallizes. You will get sugar crystals crusted all around the sides of the pan. Keep stirring slowly and constantly once it starts getting really thick. Just sweep it around, scrape it into the middle, smooth it out, turn it over. Play with it.

You will think it's going nowhere, you will be sure it will never set, you will want to turn the heat up. Don't! Be patient. When it starts to come together, it goes very quickly! All of a sudden, it will start to hold its shape. The sugar syrup will reduce until it looks like wet granulated sugar on your spoon and on the ginger. It will become opaque and paler. Soon it will stay in a pile if you scoop it into the middle of the pan, with only a little syrup leaking out around the bottom.

Now the hard part: knowing when to take it off the heat. It's difficult to describe if you've never done it or seen it done. If you take it off too soon, it will be useable but covered in sticky syrup. If that happens, you can toss it in some granulated sugar, let it dry overnight, and cut your losses. It'll still be tasty and perfectly good for cooking.

If you take it off too late, the sugar will scorch and you will have a horrible, smelly mess.

What you want to do is to quickly turn it and roll it and squish it around as it becomes more solid. Keep it moving! It's done when there is no more syrup oozing out anywhere and the mass is just starting to tumble apart because the sugar has all crystallized. It's a comparatively short window, and you don't want to miss it.

When it is stiff enough to hold its shape and sort of "roll over" when you lever under the pile with your spoon or spatula, you are moments from being done. If you take it out now, the ginger will be 100% fine, but the extra sugar will be less crystallized and fine and more like hard little clumps, and the sugar on the outside of the ginger will be harder and crunchier.

If you're in doubt, get a fork and flip a tiny piece out as you stir. If the sugar cools to a flaky coating of white, not-sticky crystals, you're good. Get it out of there.

Once you think it's ready, tip the whole mass onto a cool cookie sheet.

Quickly take two clean forks, spread it out, and start picking the pieces apart while they are still hot. The ginger will fall away from most of the excess sugar (there may be a lot of sugar or only a little bit, it varies) as you separate the pieces. You'll wind up with a lot of pliant candied ginger thickly covered in yummy ginger-flavored sugar crystals and permeated with sweetness. Eat some while it's hot and soft! It's incomparable. You cannot buy that perfection from a store.

Let the rest cool. In an airtight container it will keep for weeks. I don't know for how long, exactly; it never lasts long enough to go bad. I've had some that I found a year later, and it was fine.

You can eat the candied ginger by itself or with chocolate, drop it into hot beverages for an extra kick, or use it in recipes. It is absolutely required for authentic ginger sluts. The excess lumps and crumbs of sugar can be scraped up and stored for use in tea, or can be saved back and added to new white sugar the next time you make candied ginger.

Once you get the knack you can start making it in double batches. This will give you enough to cook with, keep for snacks, and give away to friends.

I will point out that the longer you take reducing the syrup, the hotter and more tender the finished product tends to be, though this also depends on the freshness of the root. Re-using loose sugar from one batch also raises the heat a little.

It's a fun and unusual treat, especially for those who like to mix sweet and hot. It's also an excellent nausea remedy, and has been used for ages to take the edge off morning sickness. Good stuff.
naamah_darling: Glass of tawny port on a table branded with a seven-pointed star. (Port Wine and the Morning Star)
I love you guys, so I'll tell you how to make candied ginger my way.

Start with raw ginger root. You want big, healthy roots that feel hard, not spongy. (Yes, ginger is very sexy. Why do you ask?) They should be cool and heavy in the hand, and the skin should be smooth and crisp without any leatheriness. Ten ounces of root will yield you about six ounces of prepared raw ginger. You might buy enough to try a couple of times, if you've never done this before.

Break the ginger into manageable pieces and peel them. In theory, you could use a potato peeler, but because ginger is so knobbly I usually wind up using a paring knife. Peel off all the tiny warts and cut out any discolored spots. Again, you're aiming for about six ounces. If you don't have a scale, you can guess.

Take the individual peeled pieces, take a sharp knife, and slice them. The slices should be about 1/8 inch thick, but a little thicker or a little thinner never hurt anyone. It doesn't really matter whether you slice across the ginger's fibers or with them; I've seen recipes that call for both. Whatever is easiest for you. Stab the slices seveal times with the tip of your knife to tenderize them a little, being careful not to impale your fingers.

Dump the ginger into a big bowl and cover it with sugar. For six ounces, you want 2 cups. If you don't have an exact weight to go on, mix sugar with the ginger until the sugar coats the pieces thickly. There should be a little loose sugar at the bottom of the bowl, but not a whole lot. (If you use a bit too much, it's no big deal -- it'll just take a little longer to reduce and leave you with more leftover sugar at the end.)

Put one tablespoon of water into a good-sized saucepan or skillet, pour in the ginger and sugar, and slowly bring it to a simmer. The sugar will melt into syrup, which will bubble and foam up through the ginger slices as it simmers. The ginger itself will go from stiff and white to pliant and a little translucent. When it's simmering but not boiling, turn the heat as low as you can while still maintaining the simmer and leave it alone for a while. Stir it every ten minutes or so. Be very careful with your heat – if you are cooking it too hot, it will caramelize and burn in the blink of an eye. Better to go too slow than too fast.

You will start to see a little fine yellowish-white foam clotting at the edges of the boiling center mass. This is good! Your ginger is giving up its flavor into the sugar, and by now should be giving up its aroma into the air, perfuming the whole house. Stir slowly, separating the slices as you go. It should simmer for about an hour before it begins to thicken. When the syrup drips freely but slowly off your spoon, start keeping an eye on it, stirring gently every couple of minutes. This is the tedious part, but be patient with it.

It will reduce, and reduce, and reduce, bubbling all over the surface, slowly becoming thicker and thicker as the sugar crystallizes. You will get sugar crystals crusted all around the sides of the pan. Again, a good sign! Keep stirring slowly and constantly once it starts getting really thick. Just sweep it around, scrape it into the middle, smooth it out, turn it over. Play with it. Again, make sure your heat is at an absolute bare minimum.

You will think it's going nowhere, you will be sure it will never set, you will want to turn the heat up, but be patient. When it starts to crystallize, it goes very quickly! All of a sudden, it will start to hold its shape. The sugar will become more and more opaque. Soon it will stay in a pile if you scoop it into the middle of the pan, with only a little syrup leaking out around the bottom.

Now the hard part: knowing when to take it off the heat. It's difficult to describe if you've never done it or seen it done. If you take it off too soon, it will be useable but covered in sticky syrup. If that happens, you can toss it in some granulated sugar, let it dry overnight, and cut your losses. It'll still be tasty and perfectly good for cooking.

If you take it off too late, the sugar will scorch and you will have a horrible, smelly mess.

What you want to do is to quickly turn it and roll it and squish it around as it becomes more solid. Keep it moving! It's done when there is no more syrup oozing out anywhere and the mass is just starting to tumble apart because the sugar has all crystallized. It's a comparatively short window, and you don't want to miss it. If you're in doubt, get a fork and flip a tiny piece out as you stir. If the sugar cools to a rather flaky coating of white, not-sticky crystals, you're good.

Once you think it's ready, tip the whole mass onto a cool, foil-lined cookie sheet.

Quickly take two clean forks, spread it out, and start picking the pieces apart while they are still hot. The ginger will fall away from most of the excess sugar (there may be a lot of sugar or only a little bit, it varies) as you separate the pieces. You'll wind up with a lot of pliant candied ginger thickly covered in yummy ginger-flavored sugar crystals and permeated with sweetness. Eat some while it's hot and soft! Savor the sweetness followed by the aching burn across lips and tongue, savor its satisfying texture and rich, exotic scent. It's incomparable. You cannot buy that perfection from a store.

Let the rest cool. In an airtight container it will keep for weeks. I don't know for how long, exactly; it never lasts long enough to go bad.

You can eat the candied ginger by itself or with chocolate, drop it into hot beverages for an extra kick, or use it in recipes. It is absolutely required for authentic ginger sluts. The excess lumps and crumbs of sugar can be scraped up and stored for use in tea, or can be saved back and added to new white sugar the next time you make candied ginger.

Once you get the knack you can start making it in double batches. This will give you enough to cook with, keep for snacks, and give away to friends.

I will point out that the longer you take reducing the syrup, the hotter and more tender the finished product tends to be, though this also depends on the freshness of the root. Re-using loose sugar from one batch also raises the heat a little.

It's a fun and unusual treat, especially for those who like to mix sweet and hot. It's also an excellent nausea remedy, and has been used for ages to take the edge off morning sickness. Good stuff.
naamah_darling: Glass of tawny port on a table branded with a seven-pointed star. (Port Wine and the Morning Star)
Because Halloween is right around the corner, and since Sargon is bringing home pumpkins tonight, I thought I'd share my roasted pumpkin seed recipe. The great thing about pumpkin seeds is that the recipes are versatile, and there's not much in the way of rules – it's pretty hard to screw up pumpkin seeds.

For both of these recipes, you can use seeds from any squash – butternut, acorn, delicata, etc. It's all tasty, and you get to use more of your food!


Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Scoop out the pumpkin guts and separate the seeds from the pulp with your fingers. Get all the big chunks and strings, but don't worry about smaller bits and pieces. Do not rinse the seeds! The recipes that tell you to do so are heretical! Rinsing removes the wonderful natural flavor. Once you have about a cupful of seeds, you're ready to begin.

I usually dry the seeds first, but it's not required. I just spread them in a single layer on some paper towels until they are no longer cool to the touch, but some folks leave them out overnight. People who like really salty seeds can soak them in saltwater overnight, dry them all day, and then proceed as below.

If you like, melt 1 ½ to 2 teaspoons of butter, add salt or other spices if you want, and stir it into the seeds until they are all evenly and lightly coated. You can use a tasty oil instead. A light olive oil is nice, and easy to come by. If you decide not to dry the seeds first, you don't really need to coat them with anything at all; just tip your salt in while they're still wet, stir, and bake.

Spread the seeds in a single layer and bake at 300 degrees, stirring occasionally, until they're turning a nice golden color. This can take anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes, so keep an eye on them.

When they look and smell delicious, pull 'em out, tip 'em into a bowl, and pass it around for munching.


Spicy Sweet Pumpkin Seeds

First, you gotta have one cup of roasted pumpkin seeds. If I'm going to make sweet pumpkin seeds, I just roast them dry with no butter, no oil, no salt, nothing.

In a medium bowl, add 3 Tablespoons of sugar, and ¼ teaspoon each of salt, cinnamon, ginger, cumin, or whatever else strikes your fancy. You can play with the spice mix as much as you like – there are no rules. I also like to add a little pinch of cayenne pepper.

In a skillet, heat 1 ½ Tablespoons of a flavorful oil. Olive oil works well, but there are a lot of other options. You can also use butter, which gives them a very rich and smooth flavor.

When the oil is hot, add the pumpkin seeds and two more Tablespoons of sugar to the skillet. Cook until the sugar melts and the seeds caramelize . . . once it gets going, it should only take 45 – 60 seconds, so don't step away!

Transfer the seeds from the skillet to the bowl with the sugar and spices, and stir it all up, then spread the seeds on a parchment or tinfoil-lined cookie sheet to cool.

These are positively divine.


Both recipes will keep for about a week in an airtight container, but are best enjoyed right away with friends. One word of warning: eat too many of these at once, and you will definitely notice the digestive effects the next day. It's a LOT of fiber. Just sayin'.

Edit: [livejournal.com profile] sea_of_flame just commented with this awesome-sounding recipe for pepitas, a more savory variety of roasted pumpkin seeds. Try that one, too!
naamah_darling: Glass of tawny port on a table branded with a seven-pointed star. (Port Wine and the Morning Star)
Because Halloween is right around the corner, and since Sargon is bringing home pumpkins tonight, I thought I'd share my roasted pumpkin seed recipe. The great thing about pumpkin seeds is that the recipes are versatile, and there's not much in the way of rules – it's pretty hard to screw up pumpkin seeds.

For both of these recipes, you can use seeds from any squash – butternut, acorn, delicata, etc. It's all tasty, and you get to use more of your food!


Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Scoop out the pumpkin guts and separate the seeds from the pulp with your fingers. Get all the big chunks and strings, but don't worry about smaller bits and pieces. Do not rinse the seeds! The recipes that tell you to do so are heretical! Rinsing removes the wonderful natural flavor. Once you have about a cupful of seeds, you're ready to begin.

I usually dry the seeds first, but it's not required. I just spread them in a single layer on some paper towels until they are no longer cool to the touch, but some folks leave them out overnight. People who like really salty seeds can soak them in saltwater overnight, dry them all day, and then proceed as below.

If you like, melt 1 ½ to 2 teaspoons of butter, add salt or other spices if you want, and stir it into the seeds until they are all evenly and lightly coated. You can use a tasty oil instead. A light olive oil is nice, and easy to come by. If you decide not to dry the seeds first, you don't really need to coat them with anything at all; just tip your salt in while they're still wet, stir, and bake.

Spread the seeds in a single layer and bake at 300 degrees, stirring occasionally, until they're turning a nice golden color. This can take anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes, so keep an eye on them.

When they look and smell delicious, pull 'em out, tip 'em into a bowl, and pass it around for munching.


Spicy Sweet Pumpkin Seeds

First, you gotta have one cup of roasted pumpkin seeds. If I'm going to make sweet pumpkin seeds, I just roast them dry with no butter, no oil, no salt, nothing.

In a medium bowl, add 3 Tablespoons of sugar, and ¼ teaspoon each of salt, cinnamon, ginger, cumin, or whatever else strikes your fancy. You can play with the spice mix as much as you like – there are no rules. I also like to add a little pinch of cayenne pepper.

In a skillet, heat 1 ½ Tablespoons of a flavorful oil. Olive oil works well, but there are a lot of other options. You can also use butter, which gives them a very rich and smooth flavor.

When the oil is hot, add the pumpkin seeds and two more Tablespoons of sugar to the skillet. Cook until the sugar melts and the seeds caramelize . . . once it gets going, it should only take 45 – 60 seconds, so don't step away!

Transfer the seeds from the skillet to the bowl with the sugar and spices, and stir it all up, then spread the seeds on a parchment or tinfoil-lined cookie sheet to cool.

These are positively divine.


Both recipes will keep for about a week in an airtight container, but are best enjoyed right away with friends. One word of warning: eat too many of these at once, and you will definitely notice the digestive effects the next day. It's a LOT of fiber. Just sayin'.

Edit: [livejournal.com profile] sea_of_flame just commented with this awesome-sounding recipe for pepitas, a more savory variety of roasted pumpkin seeds. Try that one, too!
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Default)
'Tis the season to be yummy, so I'm presenting you all with my ginger spice cookie recipe. I bake a couple of batches of these each year, and they are universal hits. Anyone who likes ginger snaps or spice cookies really ought to try them. They're easy, they taste amazing, and they are great at parties.

If you make them, and like them, sing out! I'd love to hear about it!

Naamah's Ginger Spice Cookies Ginger Sluts

Ingredients:

3/4 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
1 large egg, beaten lightly
1/4 cup unsulfured full-flavored dark molasses
2-5 tablespoons crystallized ginger, chopped to size of chocolate chips ("optional" but without it they are not ginger sluts)
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
granulated sugar (or turbinado sugar) for dipping the balls of dough
optional: black or cayenne pepper
optional: for raw-dough safe cookies, or vegan cookies, substitute 1/4 cup pumpkin and 1 teaspoon of baking powder
optional decoration: red and green sugar sprinkles

Preparation:

In a great big bowl, cream the shortening, brown sugar, molasses, and egg together until smooth. If you are adding pumpkin, do it now. If you are adding the crystallized ginger, add it when you are done with this step.

In a second bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and salt. Add any pepper or cayenne at this time. If you're substituting pumpkin for egg, don't forget your baking powder. When you measure the flour, use a tablespoon to add it to a measuring cup to be sure it has the proper loft, then level with a knife.

Add the flour mixture into the shortening mixture in several batches, stirring well. The finished cookie dough may be soft and may be stiff, depending on whether you used shortening in a stick (recommended, IMO) or shortening from a can (harder to stir). Either way, cover it and chill it for at least one hour.

Roll even tablespoons of the dough into balls and press one side of each ball into the turbinado or granulated sugar. Around Christmas I like to mix red and green sugar crystals with the dipping sugar, but these cookies look great with plain granulated sugar and best of all with coarse, caramel-colored turbinado sugar.

Arrange the balls well-spaced with the sugar sides up on greased baking sheets. They spread a lot! Bake them on the middle rack of a preheated 375°F oven for 10 or 12 minutes, or until the surface puffs up and then flattens way out. Keep an eye on them the first time you make them. Some oven configurations will produce a done cookie in only 8 minutes. When ready they will be gingery-colored and cracked, like Mars. They'll be a little poofy and soft but not gooey in the middle. Let them cool for a minute on the sheet (they will deflate a bit), then transfer to cooling racks with a metal spatula.

Take them out on the early side if you like chewy, soft cookies, on the late side if you want them a little crispier.

If you use strictly level tablespoons of dough, this recipe makes around 40 cookies. They will disappear much faster than you think. Don't make them too big; as I said, they spread.

Notes:

I adore richly-flavored spice cookies and if you do too, there are a few things I highly recommend adding to this recipe. Coarse turbinado sugar for dipping adds a more rustic look and a little flavor. I use full-flavored dark molasses, and I never make these with anything other than dark brown sugar. This gives the cookies a great depth of flavor. Crystallized ginger is the perfect accent to these, as it candies up during baking and gives the baked cookies a wonderful texture and bursts of flavor. I suppose you could add too much candied ginger to these, but I have not managed to do this yet. I also like to give my flour mixture a few twists of fresh-ground pepper or a pinch of cayenne about the size of the pad of your pinky finger. If you're feeling frisky, try both.

Baked properly, these are the perfect medley of rich flavor and rewarding texture, and very fun to eat!

You can get Sugar in the Raw turbinado sugar at a lot of supermarkets, and Panera usually has little sugar packets of it you can tear into and check out if you're curious how it tastes. It's good stuff.
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Christmas Me)
'Tis the season to be yummy, so I'm presenting you all with my ginger spice cookie recipe. I bake a couple of batches of these each year, and they are universal hits. Anyone who likes ginger snaps or spice cookies really ought to try them. They're easy, they taste amazing, and they are great at parties.

If you make them, and like them, sing out! I'd love to hear about it!

Naamah's Ginger Spice Cookies Ginger Sluts

Ingredients:

3/4 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
1 large egg, beaten lightly
1/4 cup unsulfured full-flavored dark molasses
2-5 tablespoons crystallized ginger, chopped to size of chocolate chips ("optional" but without it they are not ginger sluts)
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
granulated sugar (or turbinado sugar) for dipping the balls of dough
optional: black or cayenne pepper
optional: for raw-dough safe cookies, or vegan cookies, substitute 1/4 cup pumpkin and 1 teaspoon of baking powder
optional decoration: red and green sugar sprinkles

Preparation:

In a great big bowl, cream the shortening, brown sugar, molasses, and egg together until smooth. If you are adding pumpkin, do it now. If you are adding the crystallized ginger, add it when you are done with this step.

In a second bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and salt. Add any pepper or cayenne at this time. If you're substituting pumpkin for egg, don't forget your baking powder. When you measure the flour, use a tablespoon to add it to a measuring cup to be sure it has the proper loft, then level with a knife.

Add the flour mixture into the shortening mixture in several batches, stirring well. The finished cookie dough may be soft and may be stiff, depending on whether you used shortening in a stick (recommended, IMO) or shortening from a can (harder to stir). Either way, cover it and chill it for at least one hour.

Roll even tablespoons of the dough into balls and press one side of each ball into the turbinado or granulated sugar. Around Christmas I like to mix red and green sugar crystals with the dipping sugar, but these cookies look great with plain granulated sugar and best of all with coarse, caramel-colored turbinado sugar.

Arrange the balls well-spaced with the sugar sides up on greased baking sheets. They spread a lot! Bake them on the middle rack of a preheated 375°F oven for 10 or 12 minutes, or until the surface puffs up and then flattens way out. Keep an eye on them the first time you make them. Some oven configurations will produce a done cookie in only 8 minutes. When ready they will be gingery-colored and cracked, like Mars. They'll be a little poofy and soft but not gooey in the middle. Let them cool for a minute on the sheet (they will deflate a bit), then transfer to cooling racks with a metal spatula.

Take them out on the early side if you like chewy, soft cookies, on the late side if you want them a little crispier.

If you use strictly level tablespoons of dough, this recipe makes around 40 cookies. They will disappear much faster than you think. Don't make them too big; as I said, they spread.

Notes:

I adore richly-flavored spice cookies and if you do too, there are a few things I highly recommend adding to this recipe. Coarse turbinado sugar for dipping adds a more rustic look and a little flavor. I use full-flavored dark molasses, and I never make these with anything other than dark brown sugar. This gives the cookies a great depth of flavor. Crystallized ginger is the perfect accent to these, as it candies up during baking and gives the baked cookies a wonderful texture and bursts of flavor. I suppose you could add too much candied ginger to these, but I have not managed to do this yet. I also like to give my flour mixture a few twists of fresh-ground pepper or a pinch of cayenne about the size of the pad of your pinky finger. If you're feeling frisky, try both.

Baked properly, these are the perfect medley of rich flavor and rewarding texture, and very fun to eat!

You can get Sugar in the Raw turbinado sugar at a lot of supermarkets, and Panera usually has little sugar packets of it you can tear into and check out if you're curious how it tastes. It's good stuff.
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Suck It)
I know a few of you are in the area. If anyone's out and feels like stopping by to hang or chat, I'll be doing a book signing for Writers of the Future, along with Sargon and [livejournal.com profile] mtreiten. The signing's at Steve's Sundries, from 5pm to 7pm.

Now that's out of the way, I throw two more things at you. First, a recipe for roasted pumpkin seeds, and second, more (huge) pictures of Ioan Gruffudd.

Recipe. )

And, on to the eye candy. Everyone was drooling over these, so I'll just throw the whole set out. Click. You know you want it really, really bad.

Really huge scans of Ioan Gruffudd. Dialuppers beware. )

I've about mined this vein out, so I'll turn you loose for your Halloweeny fun. Costume pictures, people! We demand costume pictures.
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Suck It)
I know a few of you are in the area. If anyone's out and feels like stopping by to hang or chat, I'll be doing a book signing for Writers of the Future, along with Sargon and [livejournal.com profile] mtreiten. The signing's at Steve's Sundries, from 5pm to 7pm.

Now that's out of the way, I throw two more things at you. First, a recipe for roasted pumpkin seeds, and second, more (huge) pictures of Ioan Gruffudd.

Recipe. )

And, on to the eye candy. Everyone was drooling over these, so I'll just throw the whole set out. Click. You know you want it really, really bad.

Really huge scans of Ioan Gruffudd. Dialuppers beware. )

I've about mined this vein out, so I'll turn you loose for your Halloweeny fun. Costume pictures, people! We demand costume pictures.

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naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Default)
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