naamah_darling: The incisors and canines of the skull of a gray wolf. (Bones)
This guy is awesome. He's in the preliminary stage of getting engraved. The pencil lines are on him. These were obviously taken before that.

Bonebiter 01
He's sound with good bone structure and a nice, heavy sagittal crest. One of the better-quality skulls I have, in fact.

We will see more of what makes him unique on the tour.

This way! )

Someone always asks, so: No, I don't know what killed him. Considering he's a leftover from the fur trade, he was probably shot. It's not pretty to contemplate, but at least I will be treating him with respect.

I will be taking progress photos of the engraving as it goes along! I'm pretty excited.

He is unnamed, though I've been referring to him informally as Bonebiter. He obviously liked to chew a lot. He will be joining Thane, Arya, Brand, Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!) and Grendel (thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher), as well as one unnamed skull, so throw your names at me in comments!

For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane)
This guy is awesome. He's in the preliminary stage of getting engraved. The pencil lines are on him. These were obviously taken before that.

Bonebiter 01
He's sound with good bone structure and a nice, heavy sagittal crest. One of the better-quality skulls I have, in fact.

We will see more of what makes him unique on the tour.

This way! )

Someone always asks, so: No, I don't know what killed him. Considering he's a leftover from the fur trade, he was probably shot. It's not pretty to contemplate, but at least I will be treating him with respect.

I will be taking progress photos of the engraving as it goes along! I'm pretty excited.

He is unnamed, though I've been referring to him informally as Bonebiter. He obviously liked to chew a lot. He will be joining Thane, Arya, Brand, Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!) and Grendel (thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher), as well as one unnamed skull, so throw your names at me in comments!

For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Lucian Wags)
Historic Victory for Northern Rockies Wolves at Defenders of Wildlife.

From the press release:

  • U.S. district court overturns Interior Secretary Salazar’s action that removed wolves in the Northern Rockies from the endangered species list
  • Ruling makes it clear that subdividing a wild population based on political boundaries rather than science violates the Endangered Species Act
  • Defenders calls for update of science and regional stakeholder collaboration to ensure continued wolf recovery and proper removal of federal protections


  • I am very pleased about this. The wolf management plan these states had come up with was irresponsible and based on prejudice and wishful thinking, not science. I am not opposed to legalizing the hunting of any animal, provided it is done humanely and provided the population can bear the burden. I want to see the gray wolf de-listed in the Northern Rockies, but it wasn't time, yet. It was too soon. The overturned ruling allowed and encouraged destructive wildlife management strategies which, if implemented, would have drastically reduced and then fragmented the wolf population, setting reintroduction efforts back twenty years.

    Hopefully this decision will encourage the development of responsible, coordinated efforts across state lines to establish and manage a healthy gray wolf population.

    States will still be allowed to kill or relocate problem animals, and Defenders also works with the local human population to reduce the wolf threat to livestock through effective nonlethal means (training guard dogs, establishing fladry fencing, surveying wolf populations on pastureland so that animals are not grazed near dens during puppy season), meaning that ranchers are not without protection from what is, after all, a predatory species right on their back step.

    I am not without sympathy for both sides, here, wolf and rancher. The people I don't have sympathy for are the middlemen, the policy-setters, local wildlife management, which would rather throw wolf populations and decades of effort and research on the part of wildlife experts under the bus than work with ranchers and wolf experts to come up with ways to reduce negative human/predator interactions. These people are meant to act as advocates and protectors of wildlife, as well as management. They have been failing in this duty because the simplest answer to the wolf problem is no wolves at all. Hopefully this won't be allowed to continue. It's not an easy job. It's not meant to be. Trying to make it easy by eradicating not just problem animals but a problem species from a given area is a dreadful approach.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Lucian Wags)
    Historic Victory for Northern Rockies Wolves at Defenders of Wildlife.

    From the press release:

  • U.S. district court overturns Interior Secretary Salazar’s action that removed wolves in the Northern Rockies from the endangered species list
  • Ruling makes it clear that subdividing a wild population based on political boundaries rather than science violates the Endangered Species Act
  • Defenders calls for update of science and regional stakeholder collaboration to ensure continued wolf recovery and proper removal of federal protections


  • I am very pleased about this. The wolf management plan these states had come up with was irresponsible and based on prejudice and wishful thinking, not science. I am not opposed to legalizing the hunting of any animal, provided it is done humanely and provided the population can bear the burden. I want to see the gray wolf de-listed in the Northern Rockies, but it wasn't time, yet. It was too soon. The overturned ruling allowed and encouraged destructive wildlife management strategies which, if implemented, would have drastically reduced and then fragmented the wolf population, setting reintroduction efforts back twenty years.

    Hopefully this decision will encourage the development of responsible, coordinated efforts across state lines to establish and manage a healthy gray wolf population.

    States will still be allowed to kill or relocate problem animals, and Defenders also works with the local human population to reduce the wolf threat to livestock through effective nonlethal means (training guard dogs, establishing fladry fencing, surveying wolf populations on pastureland so that animals are not grazed near dens during puppy season), meaning that ranchers are not without protection from what is, after all, a predatory species right on their back step.

    I am not without sympathy for both sides, here, wolf and rancher. The people I don't have sympathy for are the middlemen, the policy-setters, local wildlife management, which would rather throw wolf populations and decades of effort and research on the part of wildlife experts under the bus than work with ranchers and wolf experts to come up with ways to reduce negative human/predator interactions. These people are meant to act as advocates and protectors of wildlife, as well as management. They have been failing in this duty because the simplest answer to the wolf problem is no wolves at all. Hopefully this won't be allowed to continue. It's not an easy job. It's not meant to be. Trying to make it easy by eradicating not just problem animals but a problem species from a given area is a dreadful approach.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Blood Oath)
    I haven't done one of these in a while, and I have had this most of the way written up for a long time now. So here. Have some pictures of pretty pretty bones.

    This guy is gorgeous. He's yellowed quite a bit since I took these pictures, but is still beautiful and just impressive as hell.

    Handsome 01
    This is the skull that, for lack of a better name, I've been calling Handsome. He was young, very young, but absolutely enormous. We'll get to that in a moment. For now, note the prominent sutures in the nasal bones and around the eyesockets, characteristic of a young animal.

    More pics! Including wallpapers! )

    Anyway. He doesn't have a name. While I am kind of digging Bran/Brand/Valbrand, I'm still taking suggestions! You all helped me name Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!) and Grendel (thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher).

    So, because I think it's really fun, I appeal to you: young, large, and handsome. What'll it be? He'll be joining Thane, Arya, Grond, Grendel, Diana, and two other unnamed skulls that I will surely be asking you for opinions about.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Default)
    I haven't done one of these in a while, and I have had this most of the way written up for a long time now. So here. Have some pictures of pretty pretty bones.

    This guy is gorgeous. He's yellowed quite a bit since I took these pictures, but is still beautiful and just impressive as hell.

    Handsome 01
    This is the skull that, for lack of a better name, I've been calling Handsome. He was young, very young, but absolutely enormous. We'll get to that in a moment. For now, note the prominent sutures in the nasal bones and around the eyesockets, characteristic of a young animal.

    More pics! Including wallpapers! )

    Anyway. He doesn't have a name. While I am kind of digging Bran/Brand/Valbrand, I'm still taking suggestions! You all helped me name Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!) and Grendel (thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher).

    So, because I think it's really fun, I appeal to you: young, large, and handsome. What'll it be? He'll be joining Thane, Arya, Grond, Grendel, Diana, and two other unnamed skulls that I will surely be asking you for opinions about.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: Lucian from Underworld next to a snarling wolf. From the dark into the black, throwbacks always have to go. (Lucian Throwbacks)
    I was reading this article yesterday about the wolves of Denali National Park in Alaska. The narrative is unflinching in its description of hunting practices, and it's also very long. It's worthwhile though: thought-provoking, sad, and beautiful. It's from January, but the central conflict – conservationists vs. hunters* – is one that is still very much alive. It is also one I have mixed feelings about.

    Hunting non-threatened animals for sport or subsistence is all fine and dandy, but despite it being a non-threatened species, the wolf's fate has too often been put into the hands of people with no intention of managing it responsibly, who do not have the wolf's best interests at heart. Therefore, though I may think hunting is okay, I very seldom come down on the side of local governments who wish to profit from a particular style of wildlife management and the lawmakers who would strip wolves of their protection to facilitate this.

    Perhaps it sounds foolish, but I often feel that how we treat wild animals, especially the large carnivores, mirrors in some way how we treat women. It seems particularly acute to me when we are talking about the wolf, a grossly misunderstood animal whose recolonization of the lower 48 states is bitterly contested and the hunting of which in Alaska is so furiously debated.

    And so when I read this in the article, I felt a stab between my ribs:

    It sounds brutal, but Coke swears he loves wolves. As a hunter and guide, he just loves them differently. "I love Dall sheep, too," he says, "but I shoot them because they're food on the planet and a beautiful trophy."


    Immediately on reading that my mind shot straight to the countless times I have heard a man voice some sickening, heartless, misogynist opinion, only to follow it up with, or preface it with, "I love women."

    Substitute women for sheep, pussy for food, and replace shoot with fuck or hurt or exploit or otherwise use, and it doesn't sound so different, does it? The love of something only for its usefulness, availability, and its value as a prestige object. Trophy game, trophy wives.

    Do you love the wolf? Do you love them because they are what they are, because they are free, because they are like us in so many ways, because they can think and grieve and love? Do you love them only when you can manage them, use them for your own purposes, when you can control them, their breeding, their territories? Do you respect them, or do you enjoy them only so far as their lives and appetites don't offend your sensibilities or interfere with your own, so long as you don't think they are trying to take anything from you?

    How about women?

    You can love something and not mistake it for something human. You can love animals without seeing them as anything other than a consumable resource, individual only in their cleverness at evading pursuit, or their particular flavor of submission. You can love women the same way. Love the idea of something, what it means to you, what it will gain you, more than you love the actuality of it, more than you respect its right to be what it is.

    And that's how so many sexist jackoffs "love" women. Like you love a pet.

    In a world where people will risk their lives trying to save their dogs, yes, I believe that one can truly love a thing one doesn't think of as human. But people who say they "love" women while denying them their humanity are perceiving some otherness about women that is not actually there. They believe women are fundamentally different, and they try to play this off as a positive, as though these differences make women categorically more desirable, as though fuckability were the highest compliment one could pay a human being, and as though putting women on a pedestal above men is less dehumanizing than considering them inferior in every way. These perceived differences, positive or not, become a justification for enforcing all kinds of rules and restrictions on human minds and our bodies.

    It also becomes a basis for withdrawing support, should that difference cause too much friction. Culturally, we tolerate wildness in animals only so far as it does not cause them to challenge us, and only so long as it does not make them so clever that they won't come out to be decently shot when we want to shoot them. Women are treated much the same, regarded as bitchy or pushy or castrating whenever we demand to be treated as human beings. Men who "love" women but treat them like animals . . . do they love the women who do not act as they believe women should? Show any sign of justifiable anger, put your foot down, turn a man away, and suddenly you are a real troublemaker. In fact, it often seems incomprehensible to these people that women a) are unhappy about how they are treated, and b) might actually deserve to be treated better. As a friend's ex-husband said: "Oh, I get it! You women want to be treated like people!"

    Oh, you mean the people that we are? Yeah. Yeah, we do. Imagine that, us wanting to be treated with respect.

    I think about that hunter who "loves" wolves, and who kills them. I think about that, and I wonder if it is "love" when a life is less important than a man's desire to use that living thing however they like. I wonder if "love" is the right word for a feeling so conditional and so easily withdrawn when the particular thing is no longer useful. How can it be "love" when the individual creature can be so easily tossed aside in favor of the next, and the next, and the next? I wonder how a person can still say that they "love" women when it's all about the passion the desired thing raises in them, and not about a mutual expression of shared humanity. I wonder how a person can say they "love" wolves when all their knowledge about wolves and the wilderness in which they live serves only to make it easier for that person to find and kill them, when that is their desired consummation.

    I don't understand the belief that women were put here for the use of men, whether that use is to fuck or bear children or do laundry. I don't understand the mindset that believes that wolves were put here to look beautiful or to be shot for sport or even as "guides" representing some passionate spiritual ideal.

    It's not that I think women shouldn't do laundry or fuck or have kids, or that wanting those things is bad, or that if you would like a woman to do those things for you, you are automatically a sexist shitheel. It's not that I think that wolves aren't beautiful or should never ever be hunted or that they can't be spiritually significant. It's just that I don't mistake a thing's existence for availability, or its usefulness for its purpose. No living thing's justification for existence derives from its usefulness to another thing. No group's justification for existence derives from its usefulness to another group. A lack of usefulness is not condemnation.

    I don't know. Perhaps I'm offending one side or another here, perhaps I'm getting things all tail-turned-front and not making a lick of sense. Perhaps I'm being self-centered and narcissistic and thinking too much. Perhaps I'm comparing two things to the benefit of neither. But for me, personally, such a great part of my appreciation for the wolf comes from my appreciation for women, and vice-versa, that I can't think I'm entirely on the wrong trail here.

    "Mankind" may have domesticated the dog, which is, of course, man's best friend. Wolves still remain wild animals, not the property of men, and women desperately need to learn how to become wild. If there was ever a wild creature more suited to teach us that, I don't know what it would be.

    * Conservationists vs. hunters in the context of the article and in the context of wolf hunting specifically. In a wider sense, there is often no difference between a responsible hunter and a conservationist. How can you hunt if there are no animals and no land? I do not make the mistake of assuming that hunters are the enemy of conservation when they have been the driving force behind so much of what has actually gotten done.

    ETA: Just so you all who don't know me well don't mistake me, I don't have a problem with hunting, even hunting of predator animals, provided the population can sustain it and provided it is done responsibly. I don't want anyone to think that I'm saying all hunters are bad, or have the attitude problem I am describing here, any more than all men have an especially shitty attitude about women -- or even that the one is as common as the other. I'm also not saying that all hunters have problems with women. I'm just saying that the set of assumptions and the following thought processes that lead a man like Coke to describe and appreciate a sheep only in terms of its usefulness to him -- food, prestige -- and allow him to shoot from his front porch a she-wolf who had come to investigate a recording of wolf cries simply because she was right there, is pretty clearly similar to the thought process that allows some men to view women the same way -- as things to be taken advantage of.
    naamah_darling: Lucian from Underworld next to a snarling wolf. From the dark into the black, throwbacks always have to go. (Lucian Throwbacks)
    I was reading this article yesterday about the wolves of Denali National Park in Alaska. The narrative is unflinching in its description of hunting practices, and it's also very long. It's worthwhile though: thought-provoking, sad, and beautiful. It's from January, but the central conflict – conservationists vs. hunters* – is one that is still very much alive. It is also one I have mixed feelings about.

    Hunting non-threatened animals for sport or subsistence is all fine and dandy, but despite it being a non-threatened species, the wolf's fate has too often been put into the hands of people with no intention of managing it responsibly, who do not have the wolf's best interests at heart. Therefore, though I may think hunting is okay, I very seldom come down on the side of local governments who wish to profit from a particular style of wildlife management and the lawmakers who would strip wolves of their protection to facilitate this.

    Perhaps it sounds foolish, but I often feel that how we treat wild animals, especially the large carnivores, mirrors in some way how we treat women. It seems particularly acute to me when we are talking about the wolf, a grossly misunderstood animal whose recolonization of the lower 48 states is bitterly contested and the hunting of which in Alaska is so furiously debated.

    And so when I read this in the article, I felt a stab between my ribs:

    It sounds brutal, but Coke swears he loves wolves. As a hunter and guide, he just loves them differently. "I love Dall sheep, too," he says, "but I shoot them because they're food on the planet and a beautiful trophy."


    Immediately on reading that my mind shot straight to the countless times I have heard a man voice some sickening, heartless, misogynist opinion, only to follow it up with, or preface it with, "I love women."

    Substitute women for sheep, pussy for food, and replace shoot with fuck or hurt or exploit or otherwise use, and it doesn't sound so different, does it? The love of something only for its usefulness, availability, and its value as a prestige object. Trophy game, trophy wives.

    Do you love the wolf? Do you love them because they are what they are, because they are free, because they are like us in so many ways, because they can think and grieve and love? Do you love them only when you can manage them, use them for your own purposes, when you can control them, their breeding, their territories? Do you respect them, or do you enjoy them only so far as their lives and appetites don't offend your sensibilities or interfere with your own, so long as you don't think they are trying to take anything from you?

    How about women?

    You can love something and not mistake it for something human. You can love animals without seeing them as anything other than a consumable resource, individual only in their cleverness at evading pursuit, or their particular flavor of submission. You can love women the same way. Love the idea of something, what it means to you, what it will gain you, more than you love the actuality of it, more than you respect its right to be what it is.

    And that's how so many sexist jackoffs "love" women. Like you love a pet.

    In a world where people will risk their lives trying to save their dogs, yes, I believe that one can truly love a thing one doesn't think of as human. But people who say they "love" women while denying them their humanity are perceiving some otherness about women that is not actually there. They believe women are fundamentally different, and they try to play this off as a positive, as though these differences make women categorically more desirable, as though fuckability were the highest compliment one could pay a human being, and as though putting women on a pedestal above men is less dehumanizing than considering them inferior in every way. These perceived differences, positive or not, become a justification for enforcing all kinds of rules and restrictions on human minds and our bodies.

    It also becomes a basis for withdrawing support, should that difference cause too much friction. Culturally, we tolerate wildness in animals only so far as it does not cause them to challenge us, and only so long as it does not make them so clever that they won't come out to be decently shot when we want to shoot them. Women are treated much the same, regarded as bitchy or pushy or castrating whenever we demand to be treated as human beings. Men who "love" women but treat them like animals . . . do they love the women who do not act as they believe women should? Show any sign of justifiable anger, put your foot down, turn a man away, and suddenly you are a real troublemaker. In fact, it often seems incomprehensible to these people that women a) are unhappy about how they are treated, and b) might actually deserve to be treated better. As a friend's ex-husband said: "Oh, I get it! You women want to be treated like people!"

    Oh, you mean the people that we are? Yeah. Yeah, we do. Imagine that, us wanting to be treated with respect.

    I think about that hunter who "loves" wolves, and who kills them. I think about that, and I wonder if it is "love" when a life is less important than a man's desire to use that living thing however they like. I wonder if "love" is the right word for a feeling so conditional and so easily withdrawn when the particular thing is no longer useful. How can it be "love" when the individual creature can be so easily tossed aside in favor of the next, and the next, and the next? I wonder how a person can still say that they "love" women when it's all about the passion the desired thing raises in them, and not about a mutual expression of shared humanity. I wonder how a person can say they "love" wolves when all their knowledge about wolves and the wilderness in which they live serves only to make it easier for that person to find and kill them, when that is their desired consummation.

    I don't understand the belief that women were put here for the use of men, whether that use is to fuck or bear children or do laundry. I don't understand the mindset that believes that wolves were put here to look beautiful or to be shot for sport or even as "guides" representing some passionate spiritual ideal.

    It's not that I think women shouldn't do laundry or fuck or have kids, or that wanting those things is bad, or that if you would like a woman to do those things for you, you are automatically a sexist shitheel. It's not that I think that wolves aren't beautiful or should never ever be hunted or that they can't be spiritually significant. It's just that I don't mistake a thing's existence for availability, or its usefulness for its purpose. No living thing's justification for existence derives from its usefulness to another thing. No group's justification for existence derives from its usefulness to another group. A lack of usefulness is not condemnation.

    I don't know. Perhaps I'm offending one side or another here, perhaps I'm getting things all tail-turned-front and not making a lick of sense. Perhaps I'm being self-centered and narcissistic and thinking too much. Perhaps I'm comparing two things to the benefit of neither. But for me, personally, such a great part of my appreciation for the wolf comes from my appreciation for women, and vice-versa, that I can't think I'm entirely on the wrong trail here.

    "Mankind" may have domesticated the dog, which is, of course, man's best friend. Wolves still remain wild animals, not the property of men, and women desperately need to learn how to become wild. If there was ever a wild creature more suited to teach us that, I don't know what it would be.

    * Conservationists vs. hunters in the context of the article and in the context of wolf hunting specifically. In a wider sense, there is often no difference between a responsible hunter and a conservationist. How can you hunt if there are no animals and no land? I do not make the mistake of assuming that hunters are the enemy of conservation when they have been the driving force behind so much of what has actually gotten done.

    ETA: Just so you all who don't know me well don't mistake me, I don't have a problem with hunting, even hunting of predator animals, provided the population can sustain it and provided it is done responsibly. I don't want anyone to think that I'm saying all hunters are bad, or have the attitude problem I am describing here, any more than all men have an especially shitty attitude about women -- or even that the one is as common as the other. I'm also not saying that all hunters have problems with women. I'm just saying that the set of assumptions and the following thought processes that lead a man like Coke to describe and appreciate a sheep only in terms of its usefulness to him -- food, prestige -- and allow him to shoot from his front porch a she-wolf who had come to investigate a recording of wolf cries simply because she was right there, is pretty clearly similar to the thought process that allows some men to view women the same way -- as things to be taken advantage of.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Alpha Female)
    I don't really need this interpreted, as the symbolism of it is pretty apparent to me even if I don't know what it means. But it was a very cool dream that description will hardly do justice, and so I reproduce it here so that I won't forget it. I am not usually me -- as in, this body -- in my dreams but this was an exception.

    I will warn you that while it is not tremendously graphic, it contains sex, incest, bestiality, and incidental homosexuality. So be warned of that before you go any further.

    Ready? )

    And that's pretty much when I woke up, half-drunk with sleep and really pissed off at the awful timing of the much-needed bathroom break. And then I sat down to write this before I forgot. And now I am going back to bed to see if I can catch the rest of that dream.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Alpha Female)
    I don't really need this interpreted, as the symbolism of it is pretty apparent to me even if I don't know what it means. But it was a very cool dream that description will hardly do justice, and so I reproduce it here so that I won't forget it. I am not usually me -- as in, this body -- in my dreams but this was an exception.

    I will warn you that while it is not tremendously graphic, it contains sex, incest, bestiality, and incidental homosexuality. So be warned of that before you go any further.

    Ready? )

    And that's pretty much when I woke up, half-drunk with sleep and really pissed off at the awful timing of the much-needed bathroom break. And then I sat down to write this before I forgot. And now I am going back to bed to see if I can catch the rest of that dream.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    Hey, remember that vaguely embarrassing wolf penis question I asked a while back? About the penis bones? Well, part of that was motivated by me actually coming into possession of one.

    But you can't expect me to just leave my wolf baculum just lying around! Heavens, no!*

    I made it a bottle! And a story to go with it!

    Werewolf Baculum 01
    The label was handmade and applied with acrylic gel, then the top bound with twine and decorated with bone beads.

    More pictures below. )

    So, my question for you all is, would you like me to post the short historical entries that go along with these? I think they're quite fun.

    * It might find its way into someone's alcoholic beverage and become the beginning of a bad pub joke.

    ** I'm looking totally innocent, here.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    Hey, remember that vaguely embarrassing wolf penis question I asked a while back? About the penis bones? Well, part of that was motivated by me actually coming into possession of one.

    But you can't expect me to just leave my wolf baculum just lying around! Heavens, no!*

    I made it a bottle! And a story to go with it!

    Werewolf Baculum 01
    The label was handmade and applied with acrylic gel, then the top bound with twine and decorated with bone beads.

    More pictures below. )

    So, my question for you all is, would you like me to post the short historical entries that go along with these? I think they're quite fun.

    * It might find its way into someone's alcoholic beverage and become the beginning of a bad pub joke.

    ** I'm looking totally innocent, here.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    I'm not going to be around on LJ for the actual day so I thought I'd share the sentiment early, and while I'm at it, share a creepy bunch of photos!

    This is the wolf pack as it currently stands. It is worth it on every one of these to click through and go to the "all sizes" tab to get the super-huge version. I've been using these as wallpaper; feel free to do the same.

    I think they came out really well. Badass, in fact. They also really gave me the creeps when I first uploaded them, which isn't easy, let alone easy for me to do to myself. Enjoy!

    Ghost Pack 01
    Once our throats were full of singing.

    Pause, now, and feel our breath. )

    The little statue (did you notice it?) was given to me on my 13th birthday, which I spent in Monument Valley State Park, Utah. It was a magical place. Given the southwesterny-ness of where it was bought and the classic sitting posture it's probably meant to be a coyote, but I always thought of it as a wolf. It's just cheap plastic but I absolutely love it, and it's one of my more treasured knickknacks. It sat on my altar for a long time, beside a small statue of Bastet.

    Anyway, enjoy Halloween, and I'll see you on the other side!
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    I'm not going to be around on LJ for the actual day so I thought I'd share the sentiment early, and while I'm at it, share a creepy bunch of photos!

    This is the wolf pack as it currently stands. It is worth it on every one of these to click through and go to the "all sizes" tab to get the super-huge version. I've been using these as wallpaper; feel free to do the same.

    I think they came out really well. Badass, in fact. They also really gave me the creeps when I first uploaded them, which isn't easy, let alone easy for me to do to myself. Enjoy!

    Ghost Pack 01
    Once our throats were full of singing.

    Pause, now, and feel our breath. )

    The little statue (did you notice it?) was given to me on my 13th birthday, which I spent in Monument Valley State Park, Utah. It was a magical place. Given the southwesterny-ness of where it was bought and the classic sitting posture it's probably meant to be a coyote, but I always thought of it as a wolf. It's just cheap plastic but I absolutely love it, and it's one of my more treasured knickknacks. It sat on my altar for a long time, beside a small statue of Bastet.

    Anyway, enjoy Halloween, and I'll see you on the other side!
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    I bring you another one of the pack at chez Darling.

    This skull is from a fully mature animal, and sits right in the middle of the adult size range for a male. However, based on the relatively slender snout, delicate cheekbones, comparatively small maxillary processes, and less-developed lower jaw, I think this is a slightly above average female.

    I call her Diana Silverkiss. This is why:

    Diana Silverkiss 02
    Her teeth were loose when I got her, so I took out the canines and incisors, applied silver leaf, then replaced them. I think it looks pretty badass.

    More this way! )

    Diana Silverkiss 09
    This is just a pretty picture.

    I will eventually either paint or carve her, so that the teeth seem less out of place. She may very well be the first of the pack to get that treatment. There are seven now.

    I pick them up when opportunity knocks, randomly. They are byproducts, leftovers, and the idea that they will go unhonored bothers me. I gather them in so that I can make something beautiful out of them, so that some meaning can be wrung from their deaths. I intended, still intend, to carve them, ornament them, bring some power back to them. As time goes on, they acquire names. Thane and Grendel and Diana were all prepared by the same man, and so I think of them as related -- which they might be. There's Grond Grimtooth and Arya Greeneye. I haven't found names for the last two yet, but you'll see pictures soon enough and I'm sure you will help me with that, as you so delightfully have before.

    They are all similar in that they are all wolves and all just bone, and so sometimes I feel a bit odd posting pictures of what must look like very similar skulls to some of you. I try, though, to show you what makes them distinctive, to give you a bit of their story, or the parts of it I can gather. I try to show you what I feel: that a part of them remains, that this is more than something shed, something lost or left behind. They have a presence, gathered all together, a weight.

    I love them, my ghost pack.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    I bring you another one of the pack at chez Darling.

    This skull is from a fully mature animal, and sits right in the middle of the adult size range for a male. However, based on the relatively slender snout, delicate cheekbones, comparatively small maxillary processes, and less-developed lower jaw, I think this is a slightly above average female.

    I call her Diana Silverkiss. This is why:

    Diana Silverkiss 02
    Her teeth were loose when I got her, so I took out the canines and incisors, applied silver leaf, then replaced them. I think it looks pretty badass.

    More this way! )

    Diana Silverkiss 09
    This is just a pretty picture.

    I will eventually either paint or carve her, so that the teeth seem less out of place. She may very well be the first of the pack to get that treatment. There are seven now.

    I pick them up when opportunity knocks, randomly. They are byproducts, leftovers, and the idea that they will go unhonored bothers me. I gather them in so that I can make something beautiful out of them, so that some meaning can be wrung from their deaths. I intended, still intend, to carve them, ornament them, bring some power back to them. As time goes on, they acquire names. Thane and Grendel and Diana were all prepared by the same man, and so I think of them as related -- which they might be. There's Grond Grimtooth and Arya Greeneye. I haven't found names for the last two yet, but you'll see pictures soon enough and I'm sure you will help me with that, as you so delightfully have before.

    They are all similar in that they are all wolves and all just bone, and so sometimes I feel a bit odd posting pictures of what must look like very similar skulls to some of you. I try, though, to show you what makes them distinctive, to give you a bit of their story, or the parts of it I can gather. I try to show you what I feel: that a part of them remains, that this is more than something shed, something lost or left behind. They have a presence, gathered all together, a weight.

    I love them, my ghost pack.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane)
    You have to look closely, but this skull is, indeed, deformed.

    Bent 01
    This interesting boy came to me from the same gentleman who prepared Thane. If you look very carefully, you will see that his face is bent. Follow the centerline from the sagittal crest at the back of the head to the tip of the rostrum -- his nose. Note that it is curved ever so slightly.

    Note, too, that the infraorbital foramina (the holes you can see here between the eyesocket and the nose) are not on a straight line with one another.

    Believe me, we have not yet begun to explore this skull's lopsidedness. By all means, let us proceed!

    Check it out. )

    I have no idea what could've caused such a deformity but it was very old, and if it was due to trauma, it left no marks. It must have happened as a puppy, perhaps a simple birth defect present in the womb.

    I'm really happy with this guy. I sort of think of him as Thane's brother, since they were prepared by the same person. I can't help but wonder what he would've looked like. I don't think it would've been that noticeable because wolves have so much fur, and a lot of this skull's lopsidedness is in the teeth, but there would've been something very subtly "off" about his face.

    There are very few perfect skulls out there. Most have a missing tooth or two, chipped canines, a healed break, or even, rarely, deformities like this. As much as I love "perfect" skulls, these little differences give them character.

    He doesn't have a name yet. You all helped me name Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!), so I'm taking suggestions. It's Grendel. Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher for smacking me with the obvious.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane)
    You have to look closely, but this skull is, indeed, deformed.

    Bent 01
    This interesting boy came to me from the same gentleman who prepared Thane. If you look very carefully, you will see that his face is bent. Follow the centerline from the sagittal crest at the back of the head to the tip of the rostrum -- his nose. Note that it is curved ever so slightly.

    Note, too, that the infraorbital foramina (the holes you can see here between the eyesocket and the nose) are not on a straight line with one another.

    Believe me, we have not yet begun to explore this skull's lopsidedness. By all means, let us proceed!

    Check it out. )

    I have no idea what could've caused such a deformity but it was very old, and if it was due to trauma, it left no marks. It must have happened as a puppy, perhaps a simple birth defect present in the womb.

    I'm really happy with this guy. I sort of think of him as Thane's brother, since they were prepared by the same person. I can't help but wonder what he would've looked like. I don't think it would've been that noticeable because wolves have so much fur, and a lot of this skull's lopsidedness is in the teeth, but there would've been something very subtly "off" about his face.

    There are very few perfect skulls out there. Most have a missing tooth or two, chipped canines, a healed break, or even, rarely, deformities like this. As much as I love "perfect" skulls, these little differences give them character.

    He doesn't have a name yet. You all helped me name Grond (Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!), so I'm taking suggestions. It's Grendel. Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] foxipher for smacking me with the obvious.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    One of my new acquisitions, this is the skull of a very large male gray wolf (Canis lupus). He does not have a name, but I'm enthusiastically open to suggestions! (Edit: Got it! He's Grond. Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!)

    Alpha 01
    I know, I know, they probably all look the same to you. They are all very different to me. Check it out.

    More below! )

    Alpha 05
    You can see the amount of wear these teeth have sustained. This is a normal amount of wear for an old wolf. Wolves do not live an easy life.

    Also note how far the bone has receded from the gum line of the teeth. This is natural, and a helpful clue to age. Young animals often have a lot of space around the tooth where it enters the skull, making it look almost like the teeth are a size too small.

    This guy is really wonderful. I have become quite fond of him in the weeks since he arrived, and he's a stiff competitor with Thane for my favorite. I love them all, but this old guy really impressed me.

    I call him an alpha because he's so goddamn big, but that's perhaps not fair. Alphas are not always the largest wolves in the pack – that's often the beta. The alpha earns and holds his position partly by strength, partly by bravado, and partly by wit. Not that beta males are stupid, but there's a social element to pack politics that transcends physical strength, and navigating that takes a certain amount of personal force. An older, experienced, smarter animal may very well have rank over a larger, stronger animal.

    You know, beta males get a bad rap all around. We talk about someone being a "beta male" in a derogatory way, when it's actually a great compliment. It means you're a tough motherfucker, and that you perform an exceptionally difficult job very well. Being beta is not being everybody's bitch, being submissive to everyone else. That's the omega. And in a healthy wolf pack, every member contributes something, every member is necessary. Even the omega wolves.

    Wolf society is not kind, it is not fair, but it is damned efficient, and there's no room in nature for an animal that can't pull its own weight.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.
    naamah_darling: The right-side canines of a wolf's skull; the upper canine is made of gold. (Thane Gold Tooth)
    One of my new acquisitions, this is the skull of a very large male gray wolf (Canis lupus). He does not have a name, but I'm enthusiastically open to suggestions! (Edit: Got it! He's Grond. Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] crows_warning and [livejournal.com profile] tripleransom!)

    Alpha 01
    I know, I know, they probably all look the same to you. They are all very different to me. Check it out.

    More below! )

    Alpha 05
    You can see the amount of wear these teeth have sustained. This is a normal amount of wear for an old wolf. Wolves do not live an easy life.

    Also note how far the bone has receded from the gum line of the teeth. This is natural, and a helpful clue to age. Young animals often have a lot of space around the tooth where it enters the skull, making it look almost like the teeth are a size too small.

    This guy is really wonderful. I have become quite fond of him in the weeks since he arrived, and he's a stiff competitor with Thane for my favorite. I love them all, but this old guy really impressed me.

    I call him an alpha because he's so goddamn big, but that's perhaps not fair. Alphas are not always the largest wolves in the pack – that's often the beta. The alpha earns and holds his position partly by strength, partly by bravado, and partly by wit. Not that beta males are stupid, but there's a social element to pack politics that transcends physical strength, and navigating that takes a certain amount of personal force. An older, experienced, smarter animal may very well have rank over a larger, stronger animal.

    You know, beta males get a bad rap all around. We talk about someone being a "beta male" in a derogatory way, when it's actually a great compliment. It means you're a tough motherfucker, and that you perform an exceptionally difficult job very well. Being beta is not being everybody's bitch, being submissive to everyone else. That's the omega. And in a healthy wolf pack, every member contributes something, every member is necessary. Even the omega wolves.

    Wolf society is not kind, it is not fair, but it is damned efficient, and there's no room in nature for an animal that can't pull its own weight.

    For the new, a note about bones and ethics.

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